Stripping and the Football

December 3, 2017 § Leave a comment

When I last posted, I was in the process of creating the loon inlay and adding strips. Well, the loon is done, and I’m still laying strips.

With the treatment of the football, things are getting interesting again, at least more interesting than simply laying strips. The effect I’m trying to get with this build is the same as I did for an earlier one:

a_hull1

So here it goes.

At first, I placed two¬†glued strips along the center line. Towards the bow and stern, the edges are beveled a little so that they create a slight angle. Then it’s a matter of alternating light and dark strips. A note on the design is that the dark (and light) strips form a continuous line, which decreases as you get to the center of the half-football. The following picture gives you an idea.

a_hull3

At any rate, it’s a finicky bit of business, dry-fitting the pieces, making sure the tapered ends of the strips meet the neighboring strip properly. The other thing to note is that it’s crucial that the two strips that form the center line are exactly in the center. I know too well how a minor miscalculation throws off the design (whereby the points of the football half don’t line up with the other half-football on the other side). Fortunately, things are working out.

That’s it for now.

 

 

 

 

Progress and Clamping

October 24, 2017 § Leave a comment

This is the fun part of the build — laying strips and watching the canoe slowly take shape. This particular build features a loon inlay.

For the first ten or so rows, I used straight strips (in other words, no bead and cove), partly because the sides of the boat are upright and the strips sit nicely against each other, mostly because I don’t want to router a bunch of strips if I don’t have to. When I get close to the curve, I router one row that is cove only. This, then, helps me transition to the bead and cove until I get around the curve.

When clamping, bar clamps work best before the hull starts to curve. When you get to that point, the pressure of the clamp can force the strip away from the form. So when I get to the curve, I employ a variety of tools.

Bungee cords work great. I place the cord either inside or outside the hull depending on where I need a bit of extra force. Note that I use the bead part of a scrap strip to protect the cove. The blue clamp is there to press the strip against the form. In the second photo, I’ve used a C clamp and a clamp with a scrap piece of cedar to keep the bar clamps from pressing the strip away from the form, as the force at this point is as much out as down. The clamp with the wooden bracket (on the left) works to keep the strips against the form, but the downward force is seldom enough by itself to do the job well. In the third photo, I’ve used a longer bungee to wrap around the newly glued strip (again using scrap bead pieces to protect the cove). When I can’t use bar clamps any more, I use bungees almost exclusively.

And that’s about it for now.

Filling the football

March 3, 2013 § 3 Comments

Just a quick post to show how I’m filling the football. Instead of running alternating light and dark cedar strips parallel to the centerline, this time I’m running alternating light and dark strips both along the centerline and the edge of the football to form a continuous dark line that decreases as the football grows smaller. I’ll post a picture when I’m done (it’s hard to explain), but the picture below shows the progress thus far.

bottom

Ready for some football

February 26, 2013 § Leave a comment

At long last the canoe is at the point of the build called the football. At this point it’s advisable to measure from the edges of the strips to the center of the forms to make sure that everything built up evenly. If something is off, this is the time to adjust for it. Fortunately, this build treated me well and everything was even.

football2

Many builders choose to fill one half of the football with arcing strips, cut along the center line and then fill the other half. The method I prefer, partly because I can’t trust myself to cut a straight line, is to run a pair of strips down the center line and then fill the halves. In the past I’ve used this technique to alternate light and dark strips that run the length of the football. To people who haven’t seen me in a canoe, I call these racing stripes. This time, I’ll try something a little different. Less racing. More zen. Stay tuned.

The following picture shows the pair of strips run along the center line and the use of bungee cords to keep the strips tight against the forms.

center_strip

Progress thus far

February 18, 2013 § 3 Comments

The picture below contains a couple of items that I want to touch on.

The first is the inset of the bird, done in a darker cedar than the surrounding strips. Besides being an attractive feature, the inset effectively integrates joints into an overall design. The fact that grain and color don’t match (a concern when joining strips) becomes desirable. In this way, I’ve been able to do most of the sides of the canoe without obsessing about how good the joins look.

The picture below also shows the use of 1/4″ dowels to protect the coves of the strips when clamping, and the use of both clamps and bungee cords to press the strips together. As the stripping continues, the clamps eventually become too short (or the curve of the hull makes their use impossible). At this point, I use bungees and either wind them around the assembled strips or hook them from the newly-installed strip to the base of the strongback.

side

The last strip

June 1, 2011 § Leave a comment

The last strip is always a bittersweet affair. There’s the endless shaping and dry-fitting until the last sliver of a strip finally slips into the tapered opening in the hull. It’s a rush when the final strip goes in, but this rush is tempered by the knowledge that what follows is an eternity of sanding (and the stink-eye from the spouse who attributes any speck of dust in the house and every sneeze of the kids and wheeze of the dog to the dust generated in the workshop… never mind that¬† everything — EVERYTHING — happens to be pollinating right now. It’s the dust!).

But I digress.

The picture below shows the herringbone pattern that I used to fill in the hull.

And finally the hull itself, waiting for the outer stems and, of course, the sander. And the stink-eye.

Starting the football

May 14, 2011 § Leave a comment

There comes a point when it’s no longer possible to affix strips to the internal stem. Stripping the resulting opening — the football — can be accomplished in a variety of ways. Many builders strip one half of the football, cut the excess along a straight line, and then finish the other half. It’s a nice effect when done well, but falls apart if the two halves don’t match each other perfectly.

I’ve opted for a different method for the following reasons:

  • Cutting a straight line gives me the willies
  • Matching wood between the halves is more difficult if you lack the foresight and planning required (as I do)

Instead, I’ve opted to run two strips along the centerline and then fill the halves using a herringbone pattern.

The advantages are:

  • The two strips form the straight line that I want
  • It’s easier to match grain and color by working on one half of the canoe and then the other

cedar strip canoe sides

Running the two center strips requires some careful beveling as the hull at the ends have a pronounced angle. Towards the middle of the football beveling is less of an issue as the bottom of the canoe is relatively flat.

Here are a couple of other notes on running the center strips:

  • Clamping the strips together here is overkill. More likely than not, the pressure of the clamp will prevent the strips from lying flat against the forms. I’ve found that taping the strips together with masking tape is more than sufficient to hold them together until the glue dries.
  • It is crucial that you measure the distance between the edge of the football and the center strips at each form. Any discrepancy between the halves will be accentuated as you fill them in, particularly if you’re planning on using strips of different colors as accents.
  • Although I have opted for stapleless construction, this is one place (among a few others) where I do tack the strips to the forms. It is easy to alter the position of the strips when filling the football, so securing them is a good idea.

Here’s a picture of the football with the center strips in place:

centerline of football

Now for an admission of fallibility…

You’ll notice that the center strips don’t align perfectly with the strips in front in the picture above. On measuring the distance between the sides and the centerline, I noticed a small discrepancy (less than 1/8th of an inch) between the sides. Fudging the strips (as above) corrects the discrepancy. Fortunately, the external stem will cover and disguise the adjustment.

On another note: After stripping the canoe with bead and cove strips to more easily navigate the curve of the bilge, I’ve transitioned back to square edged strips. I’ve found that using bead and cove strips when filling the football tends to damage the cove, particularly if you’re fiddling around with adjustments and dry-fitting the strip multiple times. Running a rolling bevel for this part of the build is less aggravating (for me, at least).

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