Finishing the Deck

March 25, 2017 § Leave a comment

While I wait for the garage to warm up before fiberglassing the deck, I thought I’d update on the progress thus far and mention some mistakes that I’ve made. It seems that no matter how many boats I build, I’m constantly learning and often relearning lessons.

The last post saw the hull being completed. Here it is just before it was fiberglassed.

z_finished hull

For the deck, I decided on a maple leaf motif and a set of stripes aft of the cockpit.

The stripes that run off the deck align with the stripes on the hull, so it’s a pretty cool effect.

Now, in terms of lessons learned or relearned…

Glue lines drive me crazy. Most can be eliminated by sanding properly and while they are hard to see, wetting the surface usually causes them to jump out, giving you the opportunity to sand them away or using an iron to heat the glue, rendering it transparent. Knowing this, you’d think I’d be building glue line-free boats these days. Unfortunately, no. And while there are relatively few visible glue lines, where they do appear is annoying knowing that I could have averted this problem had I been less impatient.

z_glue

It’s nothing critical and probably won’t be too visible when all is said and done, but it’s a lesson relearned… Don’t rush.

The other mistake has to do with wood selection. I use 10′ strips that I join using a scarf joint. I’m pretty careful that I join strips from the same end of the board to avoid wildly different grain and color at the joint. Usually. At any rate, I had 2 joined strips left over from the hull and used these for the outside strips of the deck. Dry, the strip looked pretty contiguous, but when I put the seal coat of epoxy on, I realized that I’d been napping when I’d joined the two pieces. As a result, the color of the joined pieces is very different.

z_matching

Again, it’s nothing critical, but it still rankles.

That said, I’m pleased with the overall look of the boat and look forward to playing with it this summer.

So, on the eve of fiberglassing the deck, that elusive “perfect boat” still eludes me.

Oh, and another lesson learned: protect the hull against drips when glassing the hull. Thankfully, I remembered that one!

z_ready for glassing

 

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