Fiberglassing the canoe ends

June 15, 2011 § Leave a comment

Someone recently asked how the ends are fiberglassed, so I thought I’d dedicate a post to that.

When I glass the hull, I cut back the cloth so that it follows the curve of the bow and stern but doesn’t quite go around. When the fiberglass has dried, I sand down the jagged ends so that the fiberglass is smooth where it meets the external stem.

To cover the bow and stern, I use the excess cloth that I trimmed off when I initially covered the canoe. I apply some epoxy to the area that I want to cover and position the cloth. The epoxy helps keep the cloth from sliding off the boat while I fiddle around with placement.

When the cloth is in place, I apply epoxy with a brush. I normally cut a slit in the cloth as I follow the curve to keep the cloth from bunching.

fiberglassing canoe ends

From this point, it’s just a case of wetting out the cloth and ensuring that it lies flat against the surface.

I then add a second, narrower strip over the first for added protection.

fiberglassing canoe ends

The end result looks a little Frankenstein-ish, but sanding the layers when they are dry renders the seams invisible.

Fiberglassing the canoe

June 13, 2011 § Leave a comment

I haven’t updated the blog since finishing the stripping because… well… sanding isn’t that interesting. That said, I was careful to sand away any glue lines between the strips because these invariably appear as white lines and look gross. I also filled any gaps between strips with epoxy and sanding dust. Bigger gaps (there were a few) were filled with cedar splinters and epoxy.

But at last, with the sanding done, it was fiberglassing time. With the exception of a few hiccups, the glassing went well and I’m happy with the results.

fiberglassing a cedar strip canoe

The last strip

June 1, 2011 § Leave a comment

The last strip is always a bittersweet affair. There’s the endless shaping and dry-fitting until the last sliver of a strip finally slips into the tapered opening in the hull. It’s a rush when the final strip goes in, but this rush is tempered by the knowledge that what follows is an eternity of sanding (and the stink-eye from the spouse who attributes any speck of dust in the house and every sneeze of the kids and wheeze of the dog to the dust generated in the workshop… never mind that  everything — EVERYTHING — happens to be pollinating right now. It’s the dust!).

But I digress.

The picture below shows the herringbone pattern that I used to fill in the hull.

And finally the hull itself, waiting for the outer stems and, of course, the sander. And the stink-eye.

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